Conservation on Canvas, an Exhibition of paintings of New Brunswick’s Nature Trust Nature Preserves by artist Michael McEwing, opens at the New Brunswick Museum on October 5th



(Saint John, NB) - In celebration of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick’s 30th anniversary, Conservation on Canvas, an exhibition of paintings featuring Nature Trust of New Brunswick Nature Preserves by New Brunswick artist and art educator Michael McEwing opens at the New Brunswick Museum on Thursday, 5 October 2017, from 5-7 PM.  The exhibition, a partnership between the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and the New Brunswick Museum showcases the natural beauty of New Brunswick.  A series of 33 oil paintings captures unique ecosystems and landscapes of Nature Trust preserves from around the province. The exhibition will travel throughout New Brunswick in 2018, and will be accompanied by art-in-nature workshops, immersing visitors in the natural wonders that surround us in our beautiful province.

The project began nearly four years ago, when Michael McEwing approached the Nature Trust with the idea to capture the beauty of Nature Trust preserves on canvas. “Early on, it began to dawn on me that this project would become about more than just exploring and painting nature preserves,” says McEwing, “it has become just as much about the incredible people who have joined me on the journey. The inspiration and knowledge that has been shared from the Nature Trust board members, staff, and volunteers is now embedded in the works themselves--a merger of artistic expression and passion for the biodiversity of nature."

Featuring preserves from Grand Manan and Blacks Harbour in the lower Bay of Fundy, to Shea Lake in the North, the Conservation on Canvas exhibition is a diverse showcase of New Brunswick’s landscapes and biodiversity. McEwing explains; “This series invites the viewer to join me on this adventure of discovering the wide diversity and unique ecology of these outstanding nature preserves.”  The goal of the project is to raise awareness of the natural diversity across New Brunswick, and to celebrate land conservation as a means of ensuring these landscapes and habitat remain protected for future generations.

“The Nature Trust is proud to be continuing our partnership with the New Brunswick Museum and the art community.” says Vice President of the Nature Trust’s Board, Wayne Burley, “it has been a joy to see these paintings take shape, depicting the varying landscapes of our province, and leaving a legacy like the nature preserves they represent. The community has rallied behind this project from day one, and have supported the art-in-nature workshops we’ve hosted.”  Burley has been involved with the project as an advisor since it began.

“Our province’s landscape has been the subject of many artists’ work for over two and a half centuries – Michael McEwing’s  focused attention captures a beauty that is worthy of both our attention and our preservation efforts,“ states Peter Larocque, New Brunswick Museum Art Curator. “The New Brunswick Museum is very pleased to continue our longstanding collaboration with the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and to help share the ongoing exploration of the province’s natural beauty and to showcase the talent of its contemporary artists.”

The exhibition will remain at the New Brunswick Museum until mid-January 2018.  It will travel then travel to the Andrew & Laura McCain Art Gallery in Florenceville-Bristol, the Sunbury Shores Arts & Nature Centre in Saint Andrews and the Grand Manan Art Gallery and the Grand Manan Museum.  The exhibition tour will conclude at Government House in Fredericton in fall 2018. Art-in-nature workshops and guided excursions on nearby nature preserves will accompany the exhibition at each location, led by McEwing, fellow artists, and naturalists, that will allow guests to deepen their knowledge of local biodiversity and create their own masterpieces.

All are welcome to join the artist and representatives of the organizing partners at the free exhibition opening at the New Brunswick Museum on October 5th at 5-7 PM.

Financial support for this project has also been graciously given by TD, McCain Foods, Stewart McKelvey and other supporters.

For more information:

Caitlin Griffiths or Aristi Dsilva, Communications & Marketing, New Brunswick Museum
(506) 654-7059 or (506) 643-2358
info@nbm-mnb.ca

Curtis Richardson, Communications Coordinator, Nature Trust of New Brunswick
(506) 457-2398
curtis.richardson@ntnb.org

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Government Pre-Budget Public Consultation
Wed, Oct 18th, 2017
Pointe Verte

Government Pre-Budget Public Consultation
Thu, Oct 19th, 2017
Shippagan

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Mon, Oct 23rd, 2017
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Action Alerts

Call for nominations for the NBEN Awards - 2017

Monday, 31 July 2017
by Annika Chiasson
Every day people and environmental groups take action to protect and restore New Brunswick’s environment.  

Over this past year, who stands out in your mind? 

We invite you to nominate a group or individual deserving of one of the NBEN awards which will be presented in style at Eco-Confluence 2017.  Send an e-mail to nben@nben.ca describing your nominee’s work.  Nominees must be members or associates of the NBEN*.

Nomination deadline is September 13, 2017.

*Current NBEN Steering Committee members are not eligible for awards.

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.