Media Advisory: Fundy Baykeeper honoured tonight by Atlantic Salmon Federation


Wednesday, May 17, 2017 — Fredericton

Attention news editors: The Fundy Baykeeper, a program of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, receives the Atlantic Salmon Federation’s top national honour, the T.B. “Happy” Fraser Award, during a gala ceremony at the Algonquin Hotel in St. Andrews tonight. Matt Abbott, the Fundy Baykeeper since 2011, accepts the award.

The Fundy Baykeeper, the flagship program of the Conservation Council’s Marine Conservation Program, was selected for its longstanding commitment to the ecosystems of the Bay of Fundy, where wild Atlantic Salmon are on life support, and its decades-long work to protect New Brunswick’s coastal environments from pollution.

“Our coastlines in New Brunswick are true treasures,” says Abbott. “From the sprawling tides of the Bay of Fundy, to the warm ocean waters at Parlee Beach, our work to protect these spaces is all about consistency, dedication, and the commitment of our team to achieve results over time.”

Matt Abbott is available for media interviews upon request.

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill
Communications Director
506-458-8747 (w) | 506-238-3539 (m)
jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

MEDIA RELEASE

Conservation Council welcomes investments to protect
health of people and ecosystem at Parlee Beach

Fredericton, May 5, 2017 — Today, the provincial government announced infrastructure investments and restrictions on new development specific to the Parlee Beach area. Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement.

“Today’s announcement is an important step to protect the health of our treasured Parlee Beach ecosystem and the families who swim and play there.

These investments, coupled with better impact assessment for new developments, including campgrounds, should speed up the repair of this valued beach ecosystem. Better sewage treatment, combined with smart education programs, will reduce harmful bacteria that can pollute our coast and jeopardize human health. Keeping our bays and beaches clean always pays off for our coastal economies.

Pollution from near shore developments on the Northumberland Strait, like campgrounds and roads,  won’t be solved by today’s announcement. The Conservation Council encourages the Minister of Environment to move the coastal zone protection policy from being a paper document to a regulation under the Clean Water Act, and to classify important bay areas to protect their health, like they currently do in Maine. Putting in place a comprehensive land use policy and much wider wetland and salt marsh buffer zones for the entire Northumberland Strait region would further safeguard public and environmental health.

Projects we will monitor closely with respect to Parlee Beach water quality include the cumulative effects assessment and protocols development (which will study the impact of the total pollution going into Shediac Bay, not just pollution from individual projects), and an independent ground survey of local wetlands to improve our understanding of their size and the ecological services these critical spaces provide.”

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Background

In April, the Conservation Council welcomed the provincial government’s decision to use Health Canada’s technical and science-based guidelines for beach water safety at Parlee Beach. The protocol includes daily water quality testing, seven days a week, with all monitoring results and public health advisories posted online for easy public access.

The province announced rules for notifying the public about water quality test results after it was revealed that high levels of fecal contamination in the water at Parlee Beach, including E. coli, went unreported for the past three summers.

Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) is bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick and can cause kidney failure, urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia. When we discover E. coli in water, it usually has come from sewage runoffs, and animal faecal matter. That’s why health officials all over the world carefully monitor E. Coli and its different strains.

Health Canada has set safe limits for E. Coli in drinking water and E. coli in recreational waters. The number of faecal bacteria considered unsafe for recreational swimming varies depending on whether the bacteria is found in freshwater or saltwater. If tests find more than an average of 35 for every 100 millilitres (just a wee bit less than 1/2 cup), it is declared unsafe for all and the beach is closed.

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill
Communications Director
Conservation Council of New Brunswick
506-458-8747 | 506-238-3539
jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

April 5, 2017

FREDERICTON – The Conservation Council of New Brunswick’s Executive Director, Lois Corbett, made the following comments in response to the provincial government’s announcement today about new rules and procedures for reporting water quality at Parlee Beach:

“It’s a smart protocol, one that will increase health protection. Deciding to use Health Canada’s technical and science-based guidelines for beach water safety is the right decision.”

“Testing the health of the water every day, seven days a week, when the beach is open, will provide our citizens, our local businesses, and our visitors with clear information — Minister Rousselle gave us exactly what we needed. ”

“And now that the testing, reporting and public communications issues have been resolved, we can next move more quickly to stop the pollution that contaminates the water.”

“That step is very important and will require both stopping harmful practices like filling in wetlands and salt marshes, and reducing human and animal waste — the main source of the health threats to swimmers. We need to attack all sources — whether it is business or farm runoff, the local sewage system, or private septic tanks and recreational boaters.”

“Reducing the sources of water pollution is something we all care about but, as individuals, and we sometimes feel we have little to contribute. Well, not this time. It’s all hands on deck to fix the problem and continue to make this beach, and others, a destination of choice.”

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  • You can read the government announcement here.
  • You can learn more about the new rules here.
  • You can read more about Parlee Beach here.
Falls Brook Centre as you know is a registered charity and demonstration centre, committed to finding and promoting practical solutions to today's sustainability challenges. We are dedicated to the goals of inspiring people to work together using environmentally sound practices to create thriving local communities. What does this look like? Highlighting local economies, renewable energy options, and economically and ecologically sound land management techniques that work on the quarter-acre to 5,000 acre scales. On the ground, this is all about education aimed at all ages and addresses. If this sounds like something you could be a part of, I encourage you to visit our website and social media pages and consider becoming a Board member to make a real difference in the lives of New Brunswickers.

http://fallsbrookcentre.ca/wp/get-involved/volunteer-opportunities/

From what I'm hearing most folks don't know what's been happening regarding a second nuclear reactor for New Brunswick and a large proposed underwater power line under the Bay of Fundy from Saint John to Boston.  Although there's lots of talk about good clean green energy it seems likely the plan is to carry electricity from tidal turbines strung across the head of the Bay of Fundy and possibly a second nuclear reactor in New Brunswick.  There seems to be a lot going on here under the bed covers unknown to most of the public and most in the environmental community.  People need to know what's happening and now.  Could you post the attached items up where they will attract people's attention and people will view them.

Reference: Second Nuclear Reactor Could Happen, Telegraph Journal, January 27, 2017

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PRESS RELEASE

CCNB’s Fundy Baykeeper applauds restart of Energy East Pipeline Review and calls for a reform of the NEB before the review moves forward

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick’s Fundy Baykeeper applauds the National Energy Board’s decision on Friday to restart the Energy East review process.

“This is an important decision, but not an unexpected one,” said Fundy Baykeeper Matt Abbott. “Given the questions of bias hanging over all decisions made by the last National Energy Board panel, the only way to move forward was to void all the past panel members’ decisions.”

The ruling was made following  the filing of a Notice of Motion with the NEB on Jan 10 by Ecojustice lawyers representing Transition Initiative Kenora (TIK) calling for the Energy East proceedings to be declared void as a consequence of reasonable apprehension of bias.  Read the Motion here.

The project’s 2016 hearings were suspended late last August, after complaints were filed against two NEB board members – Jacques Gauthier and Lyne Mercier– who met privately with former Quebec premier Jean Charest while he was being paid as a consultant to TransCanada Corp. The review panel recused itself shortly afterwards, prompting demands that the review process be restarted.

All decisions made by the previous panel members are void and will be removed from the official hearing record. Those who’ve already applied to participate need not reapply, but essentially everything re-starts.

Abbott says that this decision won’t fix the NEB process regarding Energy East. The current process was put in place by the Harper Government and has been roundly criticized by many.

“The Energy East review should be delayed until a modernized review process is in place. Given the problems with NEB that the Energy East review has brought into focus, it is clear that we cannot have confidence in the NEB as it is currently constituted,” said Abbott.

“In uncertain, stressful times, it is good to know that a massive, dangerous, project like Energy East does not loom as close as it appeared to a few short months ago.”

According the NEB media release issued this morning, previous decisions that have been voided include:

  • Determination that the Energy East and Eastern Mainline applications are complete;
  • Decision to review the Energy East and Eastern Mainline applications via a single hearing;
  • List of Participants and any subsequent individual rulings on participation;
  • Lists of Issues and factors to be included in the environmental assessments under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012; and Hearing Order.
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To arrange an interview contact: Matt Abbott at 506-321-0429

The Fundy Baykeeper works for the Conservation Council to defend the public’s right to a healthy Bay of Fundy. Matt uses a  well-marked boat to patrol the Fundy coastline from Alma to St. Stephen. The Fundy Baykeeper is also part of the international Waterkeeper Alliance.

For more information on how the proposed Energy East pipeline would affect the Bay of Fundy, read the National Resource Defense Council’s report on tanker traffic in the Bay of Fundy: Sensitive Marine Ecosystems Threatened by Energy East’s ‘Aquatic Pipeline.’

For a full list of New Brunswick waterways at risk from Energy East, check out our interactive map.

For more information on the risks of Energy East to the communities of the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine, read the Conservation Council’s report: Tanker Traffic and Tar Balls: What TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Means for the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine.

For more on the Energy East pipeline, check out:




PRESS RELEASE

STATEMENT BY CONSERVATION COUNCIL'S MATT ABBOTT ON THE APPOINTMENT OF THE PANEL TO REVIEW THE PROPOSED ENERGY EAST PIPELINE

January 10, 2017

(Fredericton, NB) The Conservation Council’s Fundy Baykeeper says it should be “back to the drawing board” for the review of the proposed Energy East pipeline project, the largest ever pipeline proposed in Canada – one that would cross over 300 rivers and streams in New Brunswick and would export oil from its terminus in Saint John by supertanker across the Bay of Fundy and down through the Gulf of Maine.

“The announcement of the replacement of the project’s review panel members is but one small part of a complicated, and sorely discredited, process,” said Matt Abbott.

“Federal Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr announced an expert panel in November to make recommendations on how the NEB can be modernized, especially with respect to First Nations consultation and support, improved public participation, credible information on the potential impact to Canada’s water systems, including the Bay of Fundy, and squaring oil export with Canada’s plan to reduce carbon pollution,” said Abbott.

“It’s difficult to see how the new panel could embark on any credible process without first seeing the results of the modernization review.“

CCNB first called for a restart of the project review in August, when conflict of interest allegations forced suspension of public hearings and the eventual recusal of the former EE review panel members.

Unresolved issues with respect to any review on the proposed pipeline include whether or not new panel members will hear from scientists, First Nations and environmental groups and fishermen from New Brunswick; whether they will extend the impact zone under review to include the whole Bay of Fundy and whether they will require a complete analysis of both the business case for the pipeline and the impact of eventual spills from it on the natural environment, said Abbott.

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To arrange an interview contact Matt Abbott at (506) 321-0429

For more information on how the proposed Energy East pipeline would affect the Bay of Fundy, read the National Resource Defense Council’s report on tanker traffic in the Bay of Fundy: Sensitive Marine Ecosystems Threatened by Energy East’s ‘Aquatic Pipeline’.

For a full list of New Brunswick waterways at risk from Energy East, check out our interactive map.

For more information on the risks of Energy East to the communities of the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine, read the Conservation Council’s report: Tanker Traffic and Tar Balls: What TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Means for the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine.
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Media Advisory

Leading Canadian environmental organizations to outline expectations for Friday’s first ministers meeting on clean growth and climate change

December 7, 2016 (Ottawa, ON) — Erin Flanagan (Pembina Institute), Steven Guilbeault (Équiterre), Catherine Abreu (CAN-Rac), Dale Marshall (Environmental Defence) and Dr. Louise Comeau (CCNB) will host an online media briefing to outline expectations for Friday’s first ministers' meeting on climate change and will respond to questions.

Event: Media briefing and Q&A 
Date: Wednesday, December 7th 2016
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. (EST)
Location: via GoToMeeting webinar 
RSVP at: Media Briefing Q&A registration

Context: For the first time ever, Canadian political leaders are negotiating a pan-Canadian climate plan to meet or exceed the country’s 2030 emissions reduction target. This webinar will outline trends in Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions in light of recent announcements and will discuss the extent to which governments have made policy commitments commensurate with reducing national emissions by 30% below 2005 levels by 2030.

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Media inquiries:

Erin Flanagan (English / français)
Program Director, Federal Policy, Pembina Institute
587-581-1701

Kelly O’Connor
Communications Lead, Pembina Institute
416-220-8804

Louise Comeau
Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, CCNB
506-238-0355
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
MEDIA RELEASE

December 5, 2016

SSNB has the largest petition that has EVER happened in New Brunswick: Another 13,439 signatures to make a grand total of 27,225 to Stop Herbicide Spraying in New Brunswick Public Forests and NB Power right-of-ways.

FREDERICTON - On Tuesday December 6, 2016 13,404 WRITTEN signatures will be tabled at the Provincial Legislature which demands that New Brunswick stops spraying of public forests and NB Power right of ways. This third petition presentations represents again communities from every part of the province including francophone, anglophone and Indigenous communities. The petition drive is continuing to gain momentum and SSNB will continue with future petition signature submissions. 

A delegation of community organizers representing “Stop Spraying in New Brunswick” (SSNB) will be travelling to Fredericton from communities across New Brunswick to gather for a photo in front of the Legislature at noon on Tuesday, December 6 2016. During this time supportive MLAs have been invited to join us in this photo.

SSNB has received word, that in addition to Fredericton MLA David Coon,  MLA Jake Stewart (South-West Miramichi) will sign the petition and stand with us in the photo. MLA Jake Stewart has spoken out against forest spraying in the past year, and we are pleased that he is joining us.

Petition Presentation schedule:

Tuesday December 6, 2016
12:00 noon photo with supporting MLAs
1:00 pm: peaceful entry into the Legislature building to witness Fredericton MLA David Coon as he tables the signatures, and to hear supportive words from MLAs who are supportive of our demands.
LOCATION:
Provincial Legislature Buildings
706 Queen Street
Fredericton, New Brunswick

As you know, the Stop Spraying in New Brunswick movement has been growing rapidly since the 2015 hunting season when hunters found that there were almost no deer in our public forests. A catastrophic deer collapse continues, with the deer population now one-quarter of what it was 30 years ago.  A petition campaign which was started on December 16 2015, with an initial submission of almost 1200 signatures from Kedgwick, was followed by the submission of 12,686 signatures on May 18, 2016. This petition to Stop Herbicide Spraying in New Brunswick Public Forests and NB Power right-of-ways is now the LARGEST petition collection on record in New Brunswick history. Our government has a duty to listen to the 27,225 voters. This number will continue to grow, as more community members are becoming active in this movement. Every week we have new people coming forward to collect signatures in their communities.
 
In September 2016, a retired New Brunswicker, Amédée Boucher became actively involved in this issue, and collected over 7,000 signatures on the Acadian Peninsula in a period of just 2 months together with a few other residents. Therefore, an event was held by organizers in Tracadie, supported by SSNB, to discuss the spraying issue with great attendance. That evening Fredericton MLA David Coon, who had taken time out of his busy schedule to travel up to Tracadie on that Friday evening, received a total of 12,877 signatures that included the signatures collected by Amédée Boucher and another batch received by SSNB from all over the province. On December 2, 2016 another 566 signatures arrived in the mail to SSNB. The local Liberal MLAs refused to attend.

"The people of the Acadian Peninsula refuse to be poisoned," said Amédée Boucher, responsible for having collected a bulk of signatures in that area, "but signing  the petition is only the first step. It'll take your presence on December 6, 2016 to leave a clear message to our politicians: enough is enough."

Recent data from Maine Inland F&W, Quebec Chasse et peche, NSDNR and NBDNR shows that hunting numbers in NB are now 15% of what they were in 1985, whereas in Quebec the numbers have increased threefold and in Maine they have stayed relatively stable over the same period of time. The combination of increased clearcutting and glyphosate spraying of monoculture softwood plantations are eliminating a very large amount of deer food, removing enough browse to feed 32,000 deer each and every year.  People who live near or in the woods have noticed the effects on the deer population in New Brunswick themselves.

Wildlife guide and woodlot owner Leo Goguen from Rogersville is out in the woods all the time and has stated this before,  "Our livelihood depends on hunting wildlife and fowl. Irving not only poisoned the meat we eat but destroyed multiple game habitat that this game depends on to reproduce and strive. We are losing revenue on recreational activities and our families are being robbed of healthy food.”  Leo has also felt the detrimental effects on his livelihood as a private woodlot owner.

Northern New Brunswick is feeling the pain: “We at ÉCOVIE are very much preoccupied by what is being done in our forests”, says Clément Arpin, retired businessman from a value-added wood industry. “28% of all the forests sprayed in Canada are in NB and NB represents 0.7% of the surface of our country. This is a lot of pesticides sprayed all around us! Our beautiful mixed forests are being transformed into plantations....A monoculture is not a forest. We have to realize that a forest with diversity will bring diversity in jobs and a stability in our economy. We cannot extract maple syrup from a spruce tree. So why do we have to kill hardwood when those trees provided us a revenue increase of 1000% in the last decade as stated by our Prime Minister, Brian Gallant, on one of his visits in Kedgwick? We should work with the forest, put our people to work instead of working with pesticides and destroying our beautiful diversity.”

MLA David Coon has been a long-standing champion for the cause to stop herbicide spraying of NB forests and hydro-power lines . On December 2, 2016, David Coon released this powerful statement: “ Stop the Runaway Clearcutting and Say Goodbye to Herbicide Spraying” http://greenpartynb.ca/en/8-news/1007-stop-the-runaway-clearcutting-and-say-goodbye-to-herbicide-spraying. This quote from his statement says enough: “Ours is one of only three Canadian provinces clinging to the practice, despite numerous petitions similar to the present one, and long-standing, vocal objections from our rural residents. They have a right to a safe environment, to live free of fear for their well-being and that of the wildlife inhabiting our forests.”

“The fact that taxpayers are paying to spray our forests at a cost of $2.4M a year is just ludicrous”, says SSNB organizer Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy. “On top of that, our forestry is creating less jobs than EVER before, which makes no sense. We need to bring thinning crews back to work. We have trained workers sitting at home so that an unsustainable forest management practice can exist. People could be working and contributing to our economy instead of being underemployed.”
 
Please arrange to meet members of Stop Spraying New Brunswick and other New Brunswickers who are alarmed about the continued use of these sprays outside the legislature buildings on Tuesday December 6, 2016 at noon. All political leaders and MLA's are invited to attend and show support.

Media contacts: (will be present at the event in Fredericton)
Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, SSNB, Fredericton cell 506-292-7503 (English media contact)
André Arpin, Écovie, Kedgwick cell: 506-284-0593 (French media contact)
Amédée Boucher, Acadie Peninsula, cell: 709-792-4033

New Post from New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance

Let’s close the door on shale gas development once and for all

Commentary by Jim Emberger (Fredericton Gleaner, Nov 23, 2016) We applaud the Gallant government’s decision to amend the Clean Environment Act to ban the disposal of fracking wastewater in municipal and provincial sewage treatment systems.    The scientific studies behind the decision have long noted that municipal wastewater systems were not…

Read more …

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Media Advisory

CCNB available for comment on new report calling on federal government 
to phase-out coal powered electricity generation by 2030

What: Dr. Louise Comeau, the Conservation Council’s Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, will be available to respond to questions about a new report, Out with the coal, in with the new: National benefits of an accelerated phase-out of coal-fired power. The report will be released in Ottawa by the Pembina Institute in collaboration with CCNB and other health and environmental groups. The report assesses the potential health and climate change benefits from phasing coal out of electricity production by 2030.

When: Monday, November 21, 2016, 11 am. Atlantic

Who: Dr. Louise Comeau Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions.

Where: Conservation Council of New Brunswick, 180 St. John St., Fredericton, NB

Why: Burning coal to generate electricity contributes to air pollution affecting human health, as well as climate change through high levels of greenhouse gases per MWh of electricity produced. There is a global movement away from coal to secure health and climate protection benefits. We are asking the federal Government to announce an accelerated coal phase-out in the lead up to First Ministers meeting in Ottawa December 9, 2016.

Contacts:Louise Comeau, louise.comeau@conservationcouncil.ca506 238 0355
Barb MacKinnon, New Brunswick Lung Association, barb.mackinnon@nb.lung.ca506 455 8961
The New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance is proud to support the lawsuit filed by Elsipogtog First Nation, on behalf of the Mi’kmaq Nation, to claim Aboriginal title to the Mi’kma’ki district of Sikniktuk in New Brunswick.

Our support is grounded in many things. In recent history we have been allies against a common enemy that threatened all of us with the contamination of our water, air and land. Many of our members, both Anglophone and Francophone from around the province, stood with the people of Elsipogtog as they peacefully defended their land. Some were arrested alongside them and still others sent money and supplies to support the cause.

We have also stood shoulder to shoulder with our other indigenous allies, the Wolastoqewiyik, in the peaceful defense of mother earth, understanding that such actions are often necessary to protect that which sustains life when it is threatened.

We also support this suit because we are joined with First Nations by history, including the mutual signing of treaties in centuries past. While we cannot undo the hardships that befell First Nations in the years since those treaties were signed, we can say—along with the Supreme Court of Canada—that the passage of time does not diminish the rule of law.  Treaties signed remain treaties to be respected and enforced.

Canada’s governments and citizens alike are thus obligated both legally and morally to acknowledge the terms of those treaties which, beyond dispute, entitle the First Nations the right to protect the water, air and land necessary to support their way of life.

By doing so we also acknowledge that we are helping New Brunswick, and the world, rediscover the values that are necessary for our continued existence.

Jim Emberger, Spokesperson
New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance


Kenneth Francis accepting solidarity statement on Aboriginal Title Claim from Jim Emberger, NBASGA @ NBEN Annual Meeting (photo Mark D’Arcy)
Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter (CPAWS NB) is encouraging New Brunswickers to get involved in a public consultation on the provincial government’s proposed construction of snowmobile trails and hub in Mount Carleton Provincial Park. The provincial Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture has released an environmental assessment report on the proposal, and has invited members of the public to submit comments before November 21.

“CPAWS NB is very concerned about the impact of this project on the wilderness and wildlife of our iconic and wildest provincial park,” says Roberta Clowater, CPAWS NB Executive Director. “Unfortunately, the environmental assessment report does not do a good job of identifying the potential environmental impacts of such a trail. We encourage all New Brunswickers to share their views on this proposed project with our provincial government.”

CPAWS New Brunswick has reviewed the Environmental Assessment report, and developed a summary of comments that it hopes will contribute to the public discussion around this proposed development at Mount Carleton Provincial Park.

The summary can be downloaded at: http://cpawsnb.org/images/upload/key_messages_EIA.pdf

Our review found that:
• The provincial government has apparently not done surveys to determine if there are habitats for species at risk, such as bald eagles, Canada lynx, or Gaspé shrews along the proposed development route, especially the new snowmobile trail up the side of Mount Carleton.
• The report dismisses the potential impacts of snowmobile noise and compaction of snow on wildlife, ignoring a significant body of research that indicates snowmobiling can negatively impact moose, bald eagles, hibernating bears and small mammals over the long term.
• The report also ignores evidence that snowmobiles and groomers can reduce winter survival for small mammals by compacting snow or collapsing the tunnels they use to search for food, which could affect food sources for owls, hawks, Canada lynx, foxes, and American marten – resulting in impacts up the food chain.

“Mount Carleton Provincial Park is one of our most treasured landscapes and the provincial government is supposed to protect it as a beautiful wild place for all New Brunswickers to enjoy, now and in the future. The significant gaps in the assessment report reinforce CPAWS NB’s belief that the proposed new snowmobile trail up the side of Mount Carleton should not move forward. It is difficult to see how the Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture can undertake this part of the project in a way that avoids or mitigates the potential impacts on wildlife and trail erosion. We hope the environmental assessment process gives serious consideration to all of the missing information related to this project, especially given the public expectation for higher scrutiny of development proposals in a provincial park,” Clowater noted.

The public can submit comments on or before November 21 to: lynn.white@gnb.ca or mailed to Lynn White, Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1.
MEDIA RELEASE

Are you concerned about pesticide spraying in our forests?

Do you want  to know more about this practice in our area? A large gathering is organized by a group of citizens concerned with spraying  and its impact on our health:

Friday, November 18 at 7: 00
Marché Centre-Ville
Tracadie, NB

A total of at least 14,000 signatures to Stop Spraying NB will be presented on this evening. David Coon, leader of the Green Party of New Brunswick, has agreed to accept and table the petition to the Legislative Assembly in Fredericton. He will therefore be present at the meeting.

Of these 14,000 signatures, a total of 8,000 signatures were gathered in the Acadian Peninsula alone in a 3 month period for the ongoing Stop Spraying NB petition campaign (14,000 signatures collected province-wide had already been submitted at the NB Legislature on May 18, 2016). The other 6,000 signatures have been received from all over the rest of the province by many citizens for the group Stop Spraying New Brunswick. The Acadian Peninsula is now part of the provincial movement  STOP SPRAYING N.B. But in addition to the forests, the people of this part of the province are also greatly concerned about spraying in the blueberry fields . "The people of the Peninsula refuse to be poisoned," said Amédée Boucher, responsible for having collected a bulk of signatures, "but signing  the petition is only the first step. It'll take your presence November 18 to leave a clear message to our politicians: enough is enough. " He invites  all organizations who are concerned about our forests, nature, health and future generations, to support them.  Mme. Nancy Benoit, mother of three young children, adds "cancer rates have increased dramatically in New Brunswick and every year, every family is affected by this disease and increasingly young. It is more than time we do something . "  M. Eloi Benoit, for his part, believes "that we must think of future generations and if we continue like this, we're going in the wrong direction. Also, who is taking care of animals? "concludes Mr. Benoit. Please join us!

We have now submitted a total of 28,000 signatures since the campaign began in December, 2015.

For more information in English, contact Francois Couturier at 506-252-7784.
On November 9, 2016 Elsipogtog First Nation is filing a claim on behalf of the Mi’kmaq Nation for Aboriginal title to the Mi’kma’ki district of Sikniktuk in New Brunswick.

This claim is about protecting our lands and waters for our children and our future generations,” said Elsipogtog Chief Arren Sock. “We cannot stand by while the government ignores us and makes decisions that threaten the traditional lands of the Mi’kmaq people. It’s time for us to exercise our rights and responsibilities to protect our territory.”

The Mi’kmaq, including Elsipogtog’s ancestors, signed treaties of peace and friendship with the British Crown in the 1760s. The treaties did not include the surrender of Mi’kmaq title to their lands. In the claim Elsipogtog asks the Court to confirm that the Mi’kmaq Nation continues to hold Aboriginal title and rights in Sikniktuk, and to order injunctions preventing the further destruction of the land, water, air and forest.

We want to offer hope and strength to our youth by taking a stand to protect Mi’kmaq title and rights,” said Kenneth Francis, speaker for Kopit Lodge, which represents Elsipogtog on resource development matters. “The federal government has promised a renewed relationship with Indigenous peoples based on partnership and respect and which is consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Unfortunately, we still see Canada and the Province disregarding our rights and making decisions that threaten the health of our people and our lands. By filing this claim we are asking both levels of government to step up and take our rights seriously.”

The claim comes at a time when both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in New Brunswick have repeatedly raised concerns about government decisions pertaining to the lands and waters in Mi’kmaq territory.

Elsipogtog intends to continue to work with our Indigenous neighbours and our Canadian allies to ensure the protection of the lands and waters that sustain us,” said Chief Sock. “As part of the Mi’kmaq Nation we have a responsibility to act as stewards of our territory. Reasserting our right to make decisions about our lands and waters is an essential part of safeguarding Sikniktuk for all of our long-term benefit.”

Media contacts:

Chief Arren Sock: 506-523-8705
Kenneth Francis, speaker, Kopit Lodge: 506-523-5823
Bruce McIvor, legal counsel: 604-785-0327
Bird Feeding Basics

Nature Moncton Workshop

Sunday, November 27, 2016. 1:00 -4:00 pm

Tankville School, 1665 Elmwood Dr., Moncton







Nelson Poirier will give a session on Bird Feeding Basics on Sunday November 27, 1:00-4:00 pm at the Tankville School, 1665 Elmwood Dr., Moncton.

Topics dealt with will include setting the best buffet that will attract the biggest variety of visitors, suggested feeder types with pros and cons, placement of feeders to best protect yet enjoy your visitors’ presence, getting to know your guests with bird guides/binoculars, the different behavior expectations of your visitors, surprise visitors, placing the "unwelcome" matt out for unwanted visitors, and suggestions on hygiene.

All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not. $8 fee per participant to cover costs.
Select Committee on Climate Change Report Could Set Stage for a Sustainable New Brunswick

Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions

October 24, 2016

The Final Report of the Select Committee on Climate Change is a testament to the value of making our voices heard. Members of the eight-member, all-party committee (http://www.conservationcouncil.ca/select-committee-engages-all-nbers-in-growing-the-green-economy/) listened to New Brunswickers and have delivered a report that could lay the foundation for long-term sustainability and stable jobs while meeting our climate protection goals.

The Conservation Council is calling on the Government to adopt the Committee’s recommendations and to tell New Brunswickers in its November 2 Speech from the Throne how it intends to convert the recommendations into action.

The Select Committee’s recommendations closely align with the recommendations the Conservation Council made it in its climate action plan. Our climate action plan proposals (http://www.conservationcouncil.ca/our-programs/climate-and-energy/) included calling on Government to phase coal out of electricity production by 2030 and to move toward a zero emitting system by expanding its commitment to renewable energy.  The Select Committee calls for fossil-fuel free electricity system by 2030 and an increase in the Renewable Portfolio Standard to 60% from 40%. We called for a carbon pricing regime where revenue would be used to finance investments in deep retrofits of buildings, including social housing, and to create incentives to transform transportation so it relies more on clean electricity. The Select Committee recommends the creation of a Climate Fund to do just that.

With respect to governance, the Select Committee also listened, calling as the Conservation Council did, for introduction of a Climate Change Act to set in law a provincial greenhouse gas reduction target of 40% below 1990 levels by 2030 and by 80 percent below 2001 levels by 2050.  The Committee also called on Government to strengthen building codes, planning legislation and guidelines, and procurement rules to require low-polluting choices. With respect to Government operations, the Select Committee calls on Government to establish a cabinet committee on climate change, chaired by the Premier, and to strengthen the capacity of the Climate Change Secretariat to get things done.

We want to thank the Committee for its hard work and for so respectfully listening to New Brunswickers. Now we wait to hear whether Government respects the Committee’s work as much as the Conservation Council does.

For more information, contact: Louise Comeau, louise.comeau@conservationcouncil.ca; 506 238 0355
Holiday greetings!

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick is excited announce that our upcoming holiday edition of Eco-Alert – our seasonal informative magazine enjoyed by over 10,000 English and French readers throughout the province – will be celebrating the many local NB producers that make buying local worth every penny!

Considering this, we are offering special holiday discounted pricing for advertisements in this issue and we would love to help spread the word about your organization this holiday.

Eco-Alert is a bilingual publication and reaches a wide demographic in New Brunswick and we think Eco-Alert would be a great fit for your business. Help us make buying local to be the new gift of choice this holiday!

You can view our rates here. We even have rates as low as $75 for special, smaller business card-sized ads!

Check out an online version of our latest issue of Eco-Alert here.

If you are interested in purchasing ad space, would like to receive a copy of our magazine, have any questions, or, better yet – have a story you want to share - please don't hesitate to give us a call at 458-8747.

We look forward to hearing from you,

 The Conservation Council of New Brunswick
Enjoy an elegant evening at The Cocoa Room in the beautiful Chocolate River Station. Join the Southeast Chapter of the Conservation Council on Sunday, October 23rd, as we celebrate all that is local with our annual 100 Mile Dinner fundraiser. A 3-course meal, guest speakers, local music, silent auction, vendor fair, and the much anticipated presentation of the Environmental Journalism Award in memory of Beth McLaughlin will make for a memorable evening indeed!




Tickets are limited and must be purchased in advance in person at The Corn Crib (337 Mountain road) or online on Eventbrite by following the link below:




https://www.eventbrite.com/e/100-mile-dinner-tickets-27824167835


100 Mile Dinner Poster
Oct. 14 2016
CCNB_Logo.png

Attention News Editors: Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement about the Department of Environment and Local Government’s report, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick - Summary of Comments, released today. She is available for comment.

The Summary of Comments report documents the feedback from public information sessions, stakeholder sessions held across the province, and online and written submissions to the Department of Environment in response to the March 1, 2016, Discussion Paper, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick.

The Minister also announced that the Department is establishing a technical working group to provide recommendations on water classification.

“The report has fairly captured the importance of protecting New Brunswick's precious water. The advice from the public, and the wealth of first-hand experience included in its pages from those working on the front lines provides a clear call to work together to produce a modern, effective and efficient water protection strategy,” said Corbett.

The Conservation Council knows that a comprehensive water protection strategy for New Brunswick will:

  • be science-based, involving baseline data, cumulative impacts, e-flows (the minimum amount of water required to sustain aquatic life in rivers and streams), and be tailored to meet the needs of each of the 13 watersheds in N.B.;

  • set goals for water quality objectives;

  • protect both surface waters (lakes, streams, rivers) and groundwater as well as our marine coastal areas;

  • be enforceable with a modern legal framework, including water classification for the province's rivers;

  • be transparent, involving consultations with First Nations, businesses, farmers, municipal officials and citizens; and,

  • be accountable, involving monitoring and regular reporting to the public on the progress of goals and objectives outlined in the water protection strategy.

“We are especially pleased to see the Minister is committed to water classification as a critical part of an overall water protection strategy by setting up a technical advisory group. I was encouraged to see support for this and for all the other important elements reflected in the Summary Comments paper. This clears the way for the government to create a comprehensive and progressive strategy, one based in modern law,” said Corbett.

-30-

Read the report, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick: Summary of Comments, here. 

Read the original March 1, 2016, Discussion Paper, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick, here.

To arrange an interview, contact: 

Emily McPhee, Communications

Office:
 458-8747
Cell: (639) 571-3388  
Email: emily.mcphee@conservationcouncil.ca
 
Oct. 14 2016

Statement on Provincial Water Protection Strategy


CCNB_Logo.png

Attention News Editors: Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement about the Department of Environment and Local Government’s report,Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick - Summary of Comments, released today. She is available for comment.

The Summary of Comments report documents the feedback from public information sessions, stakeholder sessions held across the province, and online and written submissions to the Department of Environment in response to the March 1, 2016, Discussion Paper, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick.

The Minister also announced that the Department is establishing a technical working group to provide recommendations on water classification.

“The report has fairly captured the importance of protecting New Brunswick's precious water. The advice from the public, and the wealth of first-hand experience included in its pages from those working on the front lines provides a clear call to work together to produce a modern, effective and efficient water protection strategy,” said Corbett.

The Conservation Council knows that a comprehensive water protection strategy for New Brunswick will:

  • be science-based, involving baseline data, cumulative impacts, e-flows (the minimum amount of water required to sustain aquatic life in rivers and streams), and be tailored to meet the needs of each of the 13 watersheds in N.B.;

  • set goals for water quality objectives;

  • protect both surface waters (lakes, streams, rivers) and groundwater as well as our marine coastal areas;

  • be enforceable with a modern legal framework, including water classification for the province's rivers;

  • be transparent, involving consultations with First Nations, businesses, farmers, municipal officials and citizens; and,

  • be accountable, involving monitoring and regular reporting to the public on the progress of goals and objectives outlined in the water protection strategy.

“We are especially pleased to see the Minister is committed to water classification as a critical part of an overall water protection strategy by setting up a technical advisory group. I was encouraged to see support for this and for all the other important elements reflected in the Summary Comments paper. This clears the way for the government to create a comprehensive and progressive strategy, one based in modern law,” said Corbett.

-30-

Read the report, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick: Summary of Comments, here. 

Read the original March 1, 2016, Discussion Paper, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick, here.

To arrange an interview, contact: 

Emily McPhee, Communications

Office:
 458-8747
Cell: (639) 571-3388  
Email: emily.mcphee@conservationcouncil.ca
-=-=-

 

 

News from Groups Archives

Action Alerts

ACTION ALERT: Reinstate funding to the Canadian Environmental Network

Friday, 03 February 2017
by Raissa Marks
The Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks need your help!

Historically, the Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks including the NBEN received annual core funding from the Government of Canada. This was used to facilitate networking on environmental issues across the country, coordinate national and provincial issue-based caucuses, coordinate ENGO participation in federal public consultation processes, and maintain open lines of communication between ENGOs and the federal government.

In 2011, as part of the across-the-board cuts to civil society organizations by the previous federal government, all federal funding to the RCEN and its provincial affiliate networks was cut. This left the national network and most of the affiliates with functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work.

There is hope that the current government will provide for renewed funding in its upcoming budget. This funding is crucial for the survival of the national network and many of the provincial affiliate networks. A proposal has been submitted. It now needs strong and immediate support from environmental groups and individuals across the country.

This is where you come in!

Please take a few minutes to write to Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP telling them why you value the RCEN, your provincial affiliate network, or environmental networking at the national level in general. Feel free to use the template letter provided below. You can personalize it based on your experience or simply copy and paste.

Trudeau’s email is justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca and you can find your MP’s email here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/en/members

Let’s show our federal politicians that a strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada!

Draft Template Letter:

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

I am writing to ask that annual core funding to the Canadian Environmental Network (RCEN) be reinstated.

Historically, the RCEN provided a crucial link between environmental groups across the country, both large and small. This link was vital in helping communities address environmental issues right across the country and ensuring a robust approach to the development of environmental policy in Canada.

Since funding was cut in 2011, the RCEN and most of its provincial affiliate networks have been functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work. This is not acceptable. A strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada. I urge you to reinstate core funding for this crucial work immediately.

Sincerely,

Still Time to Submit Comments - Snowmobile Trail Development up Mount Carleton

Monday, 21 November 2016
by Roberta Clowater, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
You can still send in your comments until end of day Nov 21 (Monday) on the environmental assessment report about the proposed snowmobile trail at Mount Carleton Provincial Park. If you're not sure what to say, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - NB Chapter has summarized some of our key messages here: http://cpawsnb.org/images/upload/key_messages_EIA.pdf

Please send comments or questions to: lynn.white@gnb.ca or mail to: Lynn White, Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1.
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