• Ducks Unlimited
  • Ccnb
  • EOS
  • Cpaws
  • FallsBC
  • NBLungs
  • cocagne
  • asf

Spotlight

livingwildspotlight

Blog

Check it out: Every Living Thing – Experiencing a bioblitz

Wednesday, 05 April 2017
by Raissa Marks
Header 1 blue owl

The documentary film, Every Living Thing -­ experiencing a bioblitz, will take you on an amazing journey of what it's like to spend four weeks over two summers exploring all aspects of nature – fish, insects, plants, fungi, reptiles, amphibians and mammals - that live in NB’s own Grand Lake Protected Natural Area.

Celebrate the UN Decade of Biodiversity – host a film screening in your community!

Unlike reality TV, this documentary film features real scientists speaking about real issues affecting real people living in real communities.

Every Living Thing was produced by NB-based company, Flower Power Production, in collaboration with the New Brunswick Museum's BiotaNB program.  BiotaNB is a 20-year biodiversity research project to identify and catalogue as many species in the province of New Brunswick, before human encroachment and climate change intensifies.  The NBEN is partnering with Flower Power Production to promote community film screenings of this film across Canada. 

Sooooo many opportunities to have your say

Tuesday, 22 November 2016
by Raissa Marks
There are so many government consultations going on that it’s hard to keep track! We’re making it a bit easier by compiling a list of those of interest to environmental groups and their deadlines:

Pre-budget Provincial
New Brunswickers are invited to attend upcoming public meetings focused on priorities for the 2017-18 budget. November 16-December 5

Electoral Reform Provincial
The Commission on Electoral Reform is looking at alternative voting systems, voting age, and other election rules. Deadline: November 30

Navigable Waters Federal
Review of the previous government’s changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act. Deadline: December 7

Environmental Protection Act Federal
Comprehensive review of the provisions and operation of theCanadian Environmental Protection Act. Deadline: December 1

Charities Federal
Modernization of the rules governing charities and their political activities. Deadline: December 9

Environmental Assessment Federal
Comprehensive review of Canada’s environmental assessment processes. Deadline: December 18

Fisheries Federal
Review of the 2012-13 changes to the Fisheries Act made by the previous government. Comments welcome on restoring habitat protections that were lost and also on incorporating modern safeguards. No deadline mentioned but the committee responsible is submitting its report in “early 2017”.

National Energy Board Federal
A targeted review of the NEB’s structure, role and mandate under the National Energy Board Act. Deadline: January 17

Clean Air Act Operating Approval – Irving Provincial
Renewal of the Approval to Operate for the Irving Pulp and Paper Limited Reversing Falls Complex in Saint John. Deadline: March 7

News From Groups

New Brunswick needs to step up and commit to new protected areas by 2020

Monday, 24 July 2017
by Roberta Clowater, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
July 24, 2017

Fredericton – In its latest annual report on the state of protected areas in Canada, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) is calling upon New Brunswick to step up efforts to protect more land by 2020. CPAWS’ 2017 report “From Laggard to Leader? Canada's renewed focus on protecting nature could deliver results” calls Canada out for ranking last among G7 countries in the percentage of land and freshwater protected for conservation purposes, and encourages governments to conserve Canada’s natural heritage, starting by delivering on their international commitment. New Brunswick ranks 2nd to last among the Canadian provinces and territories.

With only 10.6% of its landscape currently protected, Canada lags behind the global average of 15%, and also trails other large countries such as China, Brazil, and Australia. In 2010, as part of a worldwide effort to stem the tide of biodiversity loss, Canada committed under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity to protecting at least 17% of land and inland waters by 2020 and improving the quality of their protected area systems to more effectively conserve nature.

The report recognizes that Canadian governments are finally starting to take this commitment seriously after years of inaction. In February 2017, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for parks and protected areas publicly announced their commitment to work together to achieve this target. A new Pathway to 2020 process was initiated, and the Indigenous Circle of Experts and National Advisory Panel appointed to advise Ministers on this work.

“In New Brunswick, there has been no progress on working towards the national protected areas targets,” says Roberta Clowater, Executive Director of CPAWS New Brunswick. “There are steps that can be taken by the province immediately to help Canada reach our goals, including setting a target to increase protected areas, developing an action plan to 2020 and beyond, and protecting the Restigouche Wilderness Waterway.”

 “With less than 3 years to fulfill our 2020 commitment, we need to get going now,” adds Hébert-Daly. “In the report we identify places across Canada where a considerable amount of work has already been done on proposed protected areas. By acting now to permanently protect these sites, while also planning for what’s needed to conserve nature in the long term, Canada has a chance to move from laggard to leader.”

Clowater adds, “The New Brunswick government could create a world-class wilderness tourism destination by establishing the Restigouche Wilderness Waterway – a wide protected corridor along the river, on Crown land. Currently, 97% of the New Brunswick portion of the Restigouche watershed is open to development, and industrial development is eating away at the region’s wild forests and rivers year by year. By conserving this area’s special nature, promising ecotourism businesses could reliably promote a quality wilderness destination to nature-seeking tourists around the world.”

Protected areas are important to conserve wildlife and wilderness, as well as provide clean air and water for all Canadians, store carbon, and play a major role in improving our health and well-being. They also make economic sense. Protected areas around the world generate US$600 billion per year in direct spending, while costing less than US$10 billion per year to manage.

For over 50 years, CPAWS has been working with all levels of government, and other partners across the country to protect more of Canada’s public lands. As the only nationwide charity dedicated to the protection of our public lands and water, we are uniquely positioned to help governments protect what nature really needs.

-30-

Read the full report. http://cpaws.org/uploads/CPAWS-Parks-Report-2017.pdf

Read the Executive Summary with recommendations. http://cpaws.org/uploads/CPAWS-Parks-Report-Executive-Summary-2017.pdf

For interviews, contact: Roberta Clowater, rclowater@cpaws.org; 506-452-9902

Remembering Ben Baldwin

Tuesday, 18 July 2017
by Tracy Glynn
Ben Baldwin will forever be remembered by many Miramichiers and New Brunswickers as the farmer who used his scientific knowledge to take on the polluters of Miramichi. Ben died peacefully at his home in Miramichi on July 7, 2017 at the age of 86.

A founder of the Miramichi Environmental Society and a former board member of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Ben was a geologist and an environmentalist when being an environmentalist wasn’t cool nor easy.

Ben Baldwin at the Conservation Council’s Spring Auction in 2009.

An edition of Harrowsmith magazine from 1991 features Ben in its hometown hero series. Ben told the reporter, “Somebody has to speak out. It’s nothing particularly heroic on my part. I care about what’s happening. You get disgusted, and it takes a lot of physical energy. But as long as we live here, we can’t avoid being involved in environmental issues. We breathe the air too; we can’t just sit back and ignore the stink.”

Starting almost immediately upon his return from Western Canada to live a life on his family farm in Miramichi in 1985, Ben soon responded to remedy a local farmer’s concerns of chemicals oozing onto her property from the Domtar Wood Preserving Plant, and then to a long list of other environmental problems plaguing Miramichi.

“Ben was a big guy with a big heart who stood up for what he believed in. I had the good fortune to know Ben as a friend, and my life is the richer for it,” wrote David Coon, who worked with Ben during both their time with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

My earliest memory of Ben is of my dad, Donald Glynn, and Ben talking about their vegetables at the Miramichi Agricultural Exhibition on a hot summer day in August. Ben’s vegetables from Spruce Shade Farms almost always took first prize. Whenever dad spoke of Ben, it was always with such respect — an admiration shared by many across the province.

Ben was the partner of Inka Milewski, the Conservation Council’s former science advisor. The Conservation Council family expresses condolences and love to Inka and Ben’s children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Written by Tracy Glynn of The Conservation Council of New Brunswick

Green Jobs

Climate Change Adaptation Program Coordinator - NBEN

Tuesday, 18 July 2017
by Raissa Marks
Climate Change Adaptation Program Coordinator

Are you interested in learning, connecting, engaging with the multi-faceted groups, individuals, agencies and organizations working on environmental issues in the province?  Do you like working with people, organizing and facilitating meetings, and have experience in teamwork?

The NBEN (www.nben.ca) is a dynamic and innovative organization that functions as the New Brunswick environmental movement’s “central station” – a hub that serves to convene and connect people working on environmental issues in the province.  We are currently looking for a motivated individual to fill the position of Climate Change Adaptation Program Coordinator.

The ideal candidate will be well-organized, independent yet experienced in team work, will have experience in leading groups through consensus-based processes, and will be able to work in a multi-faceted environment where the digital interface is an integral part of the work. 

The main job responsibility will be to coordinate the New Brunswick Climate Change Adaptation Collaborative, a network of municipal leaders, regional planners, provincial and federal government representatives, non-profit groups, researchers and academics, industry representatives, and others working to advance and mainstream climate change adaptation across sectors.

Requirements:
  • At least three (3) years’ experience in project management resulting in strong organizational, planning, and project management skills
  • Strong leadership skills and inter-personal skills
  • Experience in networks and partnerships
  • Commitment to a career in the non-profit sector
  • Excellent computer skills (including websites and social media)
  • Strong oral and written communications skills in English and French
  • Familiarity with New Brunswick’s climate change action plan, Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy.
Assets:
  • Experience in climate change adaptation
  • Facilitation skills
  • Experience in event organization
  • Interest in or passion for climate change and other environmental issues
  • Driver’s license
Application deadline: July 31, 2017

Salary: commensurate with experience

Location: Moncton with occasional travel around New Brunswick; Fredericton may be considered depending on the candidate.

Nature of job: Part-time (~15 hours per week), permanent.  (This position could be combined into a full-time position with the Environmental Health Programs Coordinator if a suitable candidate is selected.) 

Please send your resume and cover letter to raissa.marks@nben.ca

Environmental Health Programs Coordinator - NBEN

Tuesday, 18 July 2017
by Raissa Marks
Environmental Health Programs Coordinator

Are you interested in learning, connecting, engaging with the multi-faceted groups, individuals, agencies and organizations working on environmental issues in the province? Do you like working with people, organizing and facilitating meetings, and haveexperience in teamwork?

The NBEN (www.nben.ca) is a dynamic and innovative organization that functions as the New Brunswick environmental movement’s “central station” – a hub that serves to convene and connect people working on environmental issues in the province. We are currently looking for a motivated individual to fill the position of Environmental Health Programs Coordinator.

The ideal candidate will be well-organized, independent yet experienced in team work, will have experience in leading groups through consensus-based processes, and will be able to work in a multi-faceted environment where the digital interface is an integral part of the work.

Job responsibilities will include:
  •  Coordination of the New Brunswick Children’s Environmental Health Collaborative, a network of over 400 people from nearly 150 agencies and organizations that are working to ensure that children in New Brunswick have healthy environments in which to learn, live, and play.
  •  Coordination of the New Brunswick hub of the ECHO (Environment, Community, Health Observatory) project, a five-year research project looking at cross-sectoral responses to the health impacts of resource development, in partnership with Université de Moncton and University of Northern British Columbia.
  •  Coordination of related caucuses, which are mini-networks of environmental groups working together on common environmental health concerns such as herbicide spraying and environmental rights.
Requirements:
  •  At least three (3) years’ experience in project management resulting in strong organizational, planning, and project management skills
  •  Strong leadership skills and inter-personal skills
  •  Experience in networks and partnerships
  •  Commitment to a career in the non-profit sector
  •  Excellent computer skills (including websites and social media)
  •  Strong oral and written communications skills in English and French
  •  Driver’s license
Assets:
  • Facilitation skills
  • Experience in event organization
  • Experience in the non-profit, health, and/or environmental sector
  • Experience with the academic/research sector
  • Interest in or passion for environmental health issues
Application deadline: July 31, 2017

Salary: commensurate with experience

Location: Moncton with occasional travel around New Brunswick and across Canada.

Nature of job: Part-time (~20 hours per week including occasional evening and weekend work), permanent. (This position could be combined into a full-time position with the Climate Change Adaptation Program Coordinator if a suitable candidate is selected.)

Please send your resume and cover letter to raissa.marks@nben.ca

Upcoming Events

Duck Days of Summer Nature Camps
Wed, Jul 26th, 2017

Deadline for Wildflower Seed Grant
Fri, Jul 28th, 2017

Deadline to complete Energy East survey
Mon, Jul 31st, 2017

Action Alerts

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.

ACTION ALERT: Reinstate funding to the Canadian Environmental Network

Friday, 03 February 2017
by Raissa Marks
The Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks need your help!

Historically, the Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks including the NBEN received annual core funding from the Government of Canada. This was used to facilitate networking on environmental issues across the country, coordinate national and provincial issue-based caucuses, coordinate ENGO participation in federal public consultation processes, and maintain open lines of communication between ENGOs and the federal government.

In 2011, as part of the across-the-board cuts to civil society organizations by the previous federal government, all federal funding to the RCEN and its provincial affiliate networks was cut. This left the national network and most of the affiliates with functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work.

There is hope that the current government will provide for renewed funding in its upcoming budget. This funding is crucial for the survival of the national network and many of the provincial affiliate networks. A proposal has been submitted. It now needs strong and immediate support from environmental groups and individuals across the country.

This is where you come in!

Please take a few minutes to write to Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP telling them why you value the RCEN, your provincial affiliate network, or environmental networking at the national level in general. Feel free to use the template letter provided below. You can personalize it based on your experience or simply copy and paste.

Trudeau’s email is justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca and you can find your MP’s email here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/en/members

Let’s show our federal politicians that a strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada!

Draft Template Letter:

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

I am writing to ask that annual core funding to the Canadian Environmental Network (RCEN) be reinstated.

Historically, the RCEN provided a crucial link between environmental groups across the country, both large and small. This link was vital in helping communities address environmental issues right across the country and ensuring a robust approach to the development of environmental policy in Canada.

Since funding was cut in 2011, the RCEN and most of its provincial affiliate networks have been functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work. This is not acceptable. A strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada. I urge you to reinstate core funding for this crucial work immediately.

Sincerely,

Follow Us On Twitter